Greenhorn Gardening Success StoryA few weeks ago, Kathy from Austrilia e-mailed me about the podcast interview with my mom. She left a touching reply, and I thought I'd share it with you guy:

 

Hello, Damon

 

I have been listening to your podcast for a long time, unfortunately I am still a little bit behind.

 

First of all I would like to say thank you for the fantastic podcast; it's very entertaining and helpful. Even though I live in Australia I still find the information that you provided is relevant to my situation.

 

The reason I am writing this email is to say how much I enjoyed the episode your grandmother participated in. After I listened to it, I got my 13 years old daughter who in high school to listen to it as well. The reason is that in her generation they do not have the concept of living with out electronics and shops. In high school you don't even have to carry text books any more because they using iPad.

 

The school is trying to help students to learn about history and maybe teach the children that with out the modern conveniences you can achieve and be happy as well. They have a programme called living history where they bring in elders who grown up in difficult time for example veterans from different wars, refugees and people who live with different disabilities to speak to students. In Western Australia it compulsory for student to do charity work to pass high school.

 

If your grandmother live in Western Australia she would be perfect candidate for our oral history section in the State Library; they have people from different walks of life talk on camera about their life so that the future generations will not forget and learn from it. I think they are living treasures because when you listen to them it touches you and ground you more than reading it from a book. Your grandmother has such a wealth of knowledge from her life time of experiences to give to future generations, and I would like to say thank you to let me listen to her story and to thank her for taking the time to tell her story.

 

Thank you
Kathy O'Keefe

 

Hello


Currently we are supposed to be in spring but our weather has changed so much for the last couple of years, at the moment it feels like late winter. While I am sitting here writing this email the rain is coming down in buckets. I am not complaining as Perth needs water, but currently we have water restrictions. I am hoping we have enough rain to stop more severe restriction eg banning house holds from watering the garden. As I am a new gardener with a new house my garden is not established yet it still requires a bit more water then normal. As an Australian we love our lawns; 'the greener the better.' But the lawn consumes so much water, so I took the plunge and I made my back yard into a flowers and vegetable garden using raise beds. The flowers jobs is to attract insects and can also can be eaten as well. At the front of the house I have a bit of a problem; the council restricts us of what we can plant out the front, I am hoping that I can do a native garden as these plants will not require as much water as normal gardens.

 


Thank you again for helping me with my garden

 


Kathy O'Keefe

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Bluegill

 

 

Interview with Holly LHommadieu about setup a new aquaponic system. For the "Growing Tip," how to select the proper size pump for your aquaponic system.

 

Get your free download  on the right way to make and use organic fertilizer, your "Greenhorn Gardener's Raised Bed Checklist," and a subscription to the Greenhorn Gardening weekly newsletter. These resources will help you save time and increase harvest, especially if you're just getting started.

 

 

 

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LatinIn recent weeks I've taken interest in studying the classics. I started with the Declaration of Independence written by Thiomas Jefferson, moved on to Booker T. Washington's Atlanta Compromise Speech, and plan on reading many others. What would a list of classic gardening books look like? What would make the list? Why?

 

We all have books we've read several times. Books where you pick up on something new each time, something you had not noticed before. This is the start of a list of gardening classics. This is also where I need your help. What gardening classics have you read? Which one continue to move you?

 

  • George Washington Carver Bulletins
  • Frederick Frye Rockwell's "Home Vegetable Gardening" and "Growing Indoors and Under Glass"
  • John Jeavons' "How to Grow More Vegetables"
  • Mel Bartholomew's "Square Foot Gardening"
  • Bill Mollison's "Introduction to Permaculture"
  • Shane Smith's "Greenhouse Gardener's Companion"

 

What are some gardening classics that you've read?

 

Grow'em big!

Damon

 

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GG Elephant Garlic Harvest

 

 

It's time for growing onions and garlic again! For the growing tip, how to harvest elephant garlic.

 

Get your free download  on the right way to make and use organic fertilizer, your "Greenhorn Gardener's Raised Bed Checklist," and a subscription to the Greenhorn Gardening weekly newsletter. These resources will help you save time and increase harvest, especially if you're just getting started.

 

 

 

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Raised Bed Grower's GuideThere was a time when people grew much of their own foods. Everyday people went out, worked the soils, and grew vegetables for their families. One day people started taking jobs that took them away from their homesteads. Because of that people had less time and less opportunity to work their gardens. Because of that many of those skills were lost. Until finally food prices skyrocketed so much that people wanted to start gardening again but needed low-cost, low-time commitment systems.

 

What does all this mean? Several weeks ago I sent out a survey asking what you'd like to see in the Greenhorn Gardening product line. Many of you requested a low-cost, low-time commitment product.

 

Well, that's what the "Raised Bed Grower's Guide" is. This is volume 1 of the Greenhorn Gardening Grower's Guide Series.

 

If you're interested check it out over on the new Amazon page.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Raised-Growers-Greenhorn-Gardening-ebook/dp/B00F996E20/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1379591647&sr=1-3&keywords=raised+bed+grower%27s+guide

 

Grow'em big!

Damon

 

P.S., Even if you're not interested in buying, but like the Greenhorn Gardening brand whether the podcast, YouTube vidoes, blog or other content, please take the time to leave a comment about that over on the Amazon page. In the long run this will help me continue to bring more great content your way. Thanks!

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Bluegill

 

 

Okay, back at Mad-Man LAbz with a new project: aquaponic gardening. For the "Growing tip," homemade fish fertilizer.

 

Get your free download  on the right way to make and use organic fertilizer, your "Greenhorn Gardener's Raised Bed Checklist," and a subscription to the Greenhorn Gardening weekly newsletter. These resources will help you save time and increase harvest, especially if you're just getting started.

 

 

 

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GG | Fishing abord the Mingrev's Folly.Greenhorn Gardening listener Mark e-mailed me the other day about how he makes his own fish emulsion. Not long ago I made YouTube video about burying fish as fertilizer like the Native American Indians did long ago. Mark sent this nice message that might help many of you make your own fish emulsion:

 

Damon, I pureed the fish parts in a blender, put them in a 5 gallon bucket(with a lid) with about 3 '' of sawdust in the bucket, added 1 pint of un sulphured molasses, Epsom salts, and filled it up with water. I stirred it every other day for 2 weeks. I added another pint of molasses the second week to help with smell and microbe growth. It smells sooo disgusting, but you can't argue with results. If you come up with a recipe that doesn't have as much order, I'd like to have it!

 

Best, Mark

 

Thanks, Mark! Sounds like another project for Mad-Man LAbz!

 

Grow'em big!

Damon

 

P.S., Do any of you have experience in making fish emulsion or fish-based fertilizers?

 

 

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Greenhorn Gardening | Cilantro

 

 

Three crucial steps to prep your autumn garden. For the "Growing Tip," how to find your frost dates.

 

Get your free download  on the right way to make and use organic fertilizer, your "Greenhorn Gardener's Raised Bed Checklist," and a subscription to the Greenhorn Gardening weekly newsletter. These resources will help you save time and increase harvest, especially if you're just getting started.

 

 

 

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Author Bio:
Mackenzie Kupfer began gardening with her nana when she was 6 years old. She looks forward to fall almost as much as she does the spring. In her spare time she enjoys attending gardening shows so she can add to her collection of vegetable gardening supplies.


Greenhorn Gardening TurnipsJust because fall is right around the corner doesn’t mean that you should start hanging up your garden hoes and turning in your gloves. Fall is actually a great time to grow some veggies and get a good harvest going. Sowing an autumn garden gives gardeners everywhere either an opportunity to continue their winning streak or a chance at the equivalent of gardening redemption. In order to not drop the ball, you need to be just as prepared for the season as you are for your summer crop.

 

Planning
Your garden obviously won’t do that well if you don’t plan it out beforehand. Decide what you want to plant and where you want to plant it before you do anything else. If you’ve never grown an autumn garden before, deciding what you want to plant may be a bit intimidating at first, but most vegetables will do really well during the fall season. I recommend that you save yourself some time and buy transplants.
If there doesn’t happen to be a nursery near you that still has some healthy looking transplants, you are going to have to start from seeds. If this is the case, you will have to give yourself more time and start growing earlier in the season.

 

Placement
You will also need to consider the placement of your autumn garden. Most vegetables require full sun so you may have to do a bit of rearranging. The area where you have your garden may get plenty of sun during the summer but that doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s adequate for the fall.
In some cases, you might have to end your summer gardening efforts a bit early in order to make room for an autumn garden. If you are low on garden space, you will need to clear out whatever you had going on even if that means pulling out a tomato plant or two.
As you would any other time of year, do everything you can to make sure the soil is as fertile and healthy as possible. If you already have a compost pile going, make sure to mix plenty of it into the soil to help replenish the nutrients that were used during your summer gardening.

 

Planting
Figuring out when to plant can be a bit tricky and varies from area to area and plant to plant. Pay attention to the directions given to your by your local nursery and on any seed packaging. In general, the trick is to plant early enough to be able to harvest before the first frost, although there are a few vegetables that are able to survive through early frost.

 

* Because you are more than likely going to be planting when it still feels unbelievably hot outside, make sure you have plenty of water available (for both you and your plants!). You don’t want your plants drying out and dying before they even have a chance a survival.

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Greenhorn Gardening radishes

 

 

Three crucial steps to prep your autumn garden. For the "Growing Tip," how to find your frost dates.

 

Get your free download  on the right way to make and use organic fertilizer, your "Greenhorn Gardener's Raised Bed Checklist," and a subscription to the Greenhorn Gardening weekly newsletter. These resources will help you save time and increase harvest, especially if you're just getting started.

 

 

 

Items mentioned in the episode

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